Nobel Winners

Since its inception in 1901, numerous Fellows and Honorary Fellows of the Society have been awarded the Nobel Prize. The first two recipients were Honorary Fellows Hendrik A Lorentz and Pieter Zeeman in 1902 for the Nobel Prize in Physics. The Society's first women winner was Honorary Fellow Marie Curie in 1903 for the Nobel Prize in Physics. Marie Curie was the first person to win or share two Nobel Prizes, being awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1911.

In 1964, Dorothy Hodgkin became not only the first female Fellow of the Society to win a Nobel Prize (Chemistry) but also the first female member of the University of Cambridge to do so. The Nobel Prize is one of many prestigious awards in the field of science that our members have been awarded and these include; The Copley Medal, The Royal Medal, The Dalton Medal, The Lomonosov Gold Medal, Max Planck Medal, The Goethe Prize, The Dirac Medal, The Eddington Medal, and the Albert Einstein Award to name but a few.

We currently have 47 Nobel Prize winners.

Image:Richard Henderson

Richard Henderson

2017 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Honorary Fellow

Image:Roger Penrose

Roger Penrose

2020 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Robert G Edwards

Robert G Edwards

2010 | Nobel Prize in Medicine
Fellow

Image:Venki Ramakrishnan

Venki Ramakrishnan

2009 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Honorary Fellow

Image:Sydney Brenner

Sydney Brenner

2002 | Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine
Honorary Fellow

Image: John Sulston

John Sulston

2002 | Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Honorary Fellow

Image:Tim Hunt

Tim Hunt

2001 | Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Honorary Fellow

Image:John Ernest Walker

John Ernest Walker

1997 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Honorary Fellow

Image:Pierre-Gilles de Gennes

Pierre-Gilles de Gennes

1991 | Nobel Prize for Physics
Honorary Fellow

Image:Subramanyan Chandrasekhar

Subramanyan Chandrasekhar

1983 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Aaron Klug

Aaron Klug

1982 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Fellow

Image:Abdus Salam

Abdus Salam

1979 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Nevill Mott

Nevill Mott

1977 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:James Meade

James Meade

1977 | Nobel Prize in Economics
Fellow

Image:Antony Hewish

Antony Hewish

1974 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Martin Ryle

Martin Ryle

1974 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Ronald Norrish

Ronald Norrish

1967 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Fellow

Image:George Wald

George Wald

1967 | Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Honorary Fellow

Image:Dorothy Hodgkin

Dorothy Hodgkin

1964 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Fellow

Image:Alan Hodgkin

Alan Hodgkin

1963 | Nobel Prize in Medicine
Fellow

Image:Francis Crick

Francis Crick

1962 | Nobel Prize in Medicine
Fellow

Image:John Kendrew

John Kendrew

1962 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Fellow

Image:Peter B Medawar

Peter B Medawar

1960 | Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Honorary Fellow

Image:Alexander Todd

Alexander Todd

1957 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Fellow

Image:Max Born

Max Born

1954 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Archer Martin

Archer Martin

1952 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Fellow

Image:John Cockcroft

John Cockcroft

1951 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Patrick Blackett

Patrick Blackett

1948 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Edward Appleton

Edward Appleton

1947 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:George Thomson

George Thomson

1937 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:James Chadwick

James Chadwick

1935 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Paul Dirac

Paul Dirac

1933 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Edgar Adrian

Edgar Adrian

1932 | Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Fellow

Image:Frederick Hopkins

Frederick Hopkins

1929 | Nobel Prize in Medicine
Fellow

Image:Owen Richardson

Owen Richardson

1928 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Arthur Compton

Arthur Compton

1927 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Honorary Fellow

Image:Charles Wilson

Charles Wilson

1927 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Francis Aston

Francis Aston

1922 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Fellow

Image:Niels Bohr

Niels Bohr

1922 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Honorary Fellow

Image:Jules Bordet

Jules Bordet

1919 | Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Honorary Fellow

Image:Max Planck

Max Planck

1918 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Honorary Fellow

Image:Lawrence Bragg

Lawrence Bragg

1915 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Ernest Rutherford

Ernest Rutherford

1908 | Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Fellow

Image:J. J. Thomson

J. J. Thomson

1906 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Lord Rayleigh

Lord Rayleigh

1904 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Fellow

Image:Marie Curie

Marie Curie

1903 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Honorary Fellow

Image:Pieter Zeeman

Pieter Zeeman

1902 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Honorary Fellow

Image:Hendrik A Lorentz

Hendrik A Lorentz

1902 | Nobel Prize in Physics
Honorary Fellow

Publications

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From Darwin’s paper on evolution to the development of stem cell research, publications from the Society continue to shape the scientific landscape.

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Upcoming Events

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13

02

Building your life-support system; a new paradigm for human placental development

Professor Graham Burton

  • 18:00 - 19:00 Bristol-Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre

Growth during the intrauterine period is a critical determinant of life-long health. During this period the placenta acts as the baby’s life-support system, transferring nutrients and orchestrating maternal adaptations to the pregnancy. But what stimulates formation of the placenta? Development of the human placenta is precocious, and for many years was considered the pinnacle of evolutionary advance amongst mammals by providing early and intimate access to the maternal circulation. Over the last two decades our understanding of the physiology of early pregnancy has undergone radical revision. It is now appreciated that for the first three months the placenta is nourished by the secretory lining of the uterus rather than maternal blood. Furthermore, evidence from domestic species and recently derived human organoid cultures indicates that a signalling dialogue operates between the placenta and the uterus, increasing the release of growth factors and nutrients by the latter. In this way, the placenta stimulates its own development, ready to support the baby. Evidence for this concept will be presented, and the clinical implications discussed.

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27

02

Mitigating mitochondrial mutational meltdown: can we save the species?

Professor Patrick Chinnery

  • 18:00 - 19:00 Bristol-Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre

Mitochondria are sub-microscopic organelles present in every cell. They convert the breakdown products of food into a form of energy the cell needs to function and survive. An unfortunate by-product is the generation of toxic oxygen free radicals that can damage DNA within each mitochondrion. With a limited capacity for repair, these mutations are passed down the maternal line, where they predispose to disease, can shorten our lifespan, and are threatening our own survival. New biological insights have cast light on the mechanisms involved, but is Homo sapiens facing mutational meltdown?  

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