Early career researchers talk about the importance of funding support

The Cambridge Philosophical Society recently funded a number of early career researchers at The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI) in Cambridge, as part of the Society's grants and funding for scientists of the future. Each researcher talks in depth about their field of research and the importance of funding for more junior members of the community.

Featured in these three podcasts are Dr Francisco Sahli, postdoctoral researcher in the field of computational cardiology at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Dr Elena Luca, a Senior Research Fellow in Applied Mathematics at University College London and Dr Jay Taylor, an NTT Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California . 

Podcasts recorded and produced by © The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI).

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01

Life in moving fluids - G I TAYLOR LECTURE

Professor Eric Lauga

  • 18:30 - 19:30 Babbage Lecture Theatre

Research in fluid mechanics has long been motivated by the desire to understand the world around us. Biology, in particular, is dominated by transport problems involving fluids, from the diffusion of nutrients and locomotion to flows around plants and the circulatory system of animals. The biological realm has therefore long been a source of inspiration for fluid mechanicians. 

In the 1950s, driven by the desire to understand the locomotion of spermatozoa, G I Taylor - the founder of modern fluid mechanics whose name is associated with this lecture - was the first to carry out a mathematical analysis of locomotion in a fluid. In the spirit of Taylor, I will highlight in this lecture examples where an analysis of fluid motion has lead to novel understanding of biological processes in the realm of cellular motility. 

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02

Should we automate?

Professor Duncan McFarlane

  • 18:30 - 19:30 Babbage Lecture Theatre

Originally a term used almost exclusively in the industrial domain, automation is now being applied in most aspects of life. Yet the rationale for automating and its implications is often not clearly understood. This talk will explore the origins of automation and examine what is encompassed by the term today. It will explore the rationale, benefits and downsides of automating - including implications for the future workforce - and will attempt to provide some signposting around whether we should automate, and if so when and where. A range of industrial automation developments from more than thirty years experience will be used to support this presentation.

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